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suej

Has anyone experienced problems this spring with Arrowood Viburnums?

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I have 2 Blue Muffin cultivars. It seemed one time I looked at them last week and they had green leaves. Now, one looks dead with sparse leaves that look skeletonized and brown. The other one has more leaves which in the last couple of days have turned brown and skeletonized. They were healthy last year flowered and had berries. They only showed minimal chewing by the viburnum beetle, I am guessing?  

 

I was thinking of buying 2 more of these native cultivar shrubs for the birds and for spring flowers and fall color. Now, I am re-thinking that idea.

 

Help!

 

 

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I believe what you are seeing is damage from the viburnum leaf beetle.  My native viburnums are particularly susceptible to the beetle.  The very small caterpillars are eating now.  I have been spraying insecticidle soap with success.  But the spraying needs to be repeated regularly as they keep hatching.

 

It is a very devastating pest in Michigan now.  Below is a link with photos of all stages of the insect.  Last year I started using Bayer Tree and Shrub on a couple of my viburnums to see if it would make a difference.  The 2 that I treated (American High Bush Cranberry) do not have damage.  I have several others that were not treated and the leaves skeletonized now.

 

http://www.hort.cornell.edu/vlb/manage.html

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Thanks for the info and the website. Frustrating when you want to plant native and help the songbirds with food and a invasive non-native pest wreaks havoc on our native viburnums. My two Arrowoodd now have only brown stems and no sign of life. Looks like they are dead. Back to looking for another berry producing shrub. So far  a friend suggested the Nannyberry V.lentago which survived in her yard. A friend from Signal Mtn TN  suggested a Beautyberry shrub, but it is a zone 6 plant. I don't know if it would survive in Michigan. 

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News on my 2 Blue Muffin Arrow wood viburnums. As a friend suggested, just wait maybe the shrubs aren't dead. There are now leafs back on the shrubs. Yesterday I noticed a few have some holes in them again.I am going to try the suggestion on the MSU website and prune off the branches that show the evidence of eggs and see if that lessens the damage next spring. I don't like using pestisides in the garden and spraying the undersides of the leaves with the suggested Bayer tree and shrub solution sounds messy.  If that doesn't work to give me back a healthier flowering and berries on the shrubs, I think I will plant a native red chokeberry instead. My other option is a Ilex Verticillata native MI holly in their place.

 

On another note, I discovered the rosette disease on my Jennie Lajoi  climbing rose I purchased many years ago from Nancy Lindley Great Lakes Roses. Bummer, so another plant succumbs to one of the diseases attacking our plants.  

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This year I noticed that the two Blue Muffin Arrow wood Viburnums I bought and planted last fall look dead.  All except for one stem on one branch has no leaves.  I have them in a bed that has very good soil-as opposed to our native soil.  It has been amended with compost, peat and topsoil from a garden center.  Our native soil has poor structure-clay and has juglone from the huge black walnut trees that occupy the lot line.  

I can't imagine what the problem is, during winter-which was a much lighter one than previous years-they were protected by a wind block fence.  

Any advice on how to save these shrubs would be appreciated.

Zone 5b to 6a...it is SW MI and has had a recent change of zones from 5b to 6a.  

Thanks.

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We usually look at the roots when we lose new plants. Dig one up and see if it madfe any new roots outside the planting-day root ball. Often the roots are so constricted that there is no way they can absorb enough water, and they dry out.

We also look at the bases of the stems, if it's an over-the-winter loss. Voles can -- and this year did in many cases -- girdle the stems of woody plants.

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I think the idea of buying 2 more shrubs for birds is really nice, But before this I would like to suggest you to beware of all the caterpillars and all viburnum leaf beetle damaging to your shrubs. A few days ago I was also planning for buying Arrowood shrub and I had it, but just after rainy season The shrubs seems to have suspected with the beetle. Then one of my neighbour suggested me to contact to Professional Pest Exterminator like Pest Exterminator in Sacramento to get Rid of these beetles on the shrub.

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